Avalanches near Checkered Demon

AVALANCHE OBSERVATION
Between Checkered Demon and Humphreys

Drainage:

Submission Info
David Enloe
Member
Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 10:00am
Red Flags: 
Recent avalanche activity
Recent loading by new snow, wind, or rain
Rapid warming
Avalanche Type: 
Dry
Slab
Slope: 
42degrees
Trigger type: 
Natural
Crown Height: 
4 ft
Aspect: 
Northeast
Weak Layer: 
Other - explain below
Avalanche Width: 
100ft.
Terrain: 
Above Treeline
Elevation: 
12 760ft.
Bed Surface: 
Ground
Avalanche Length: 
800ft.
Number of similar avalanches: 
1
More detailed information about the avalanche: 

There were two large slides in this zone. The crown profile and information (aspect, etc) is from the larger and more eastern slide (looker's left), which I will call Slide 1.

Slide 1: Propogated from wind-loaded pocket to pocket, with crowns spread throughout approximately 300 vertical feet. Some were as large as 5 or 6 feet. There were two distinct sliding layers. The first was the interface between the facets (bottom) and the newer, well-bonded (top) snow. The second bed surface was the ground, with the majority of the slide stepping down to this well-developed layer of depth hoar. Debris was hard, but blocks of snow were generally less that 1-2 ft in any dimension.

Slide 2: Didn't spend much time here due to ominous hangfire. Slightly more eastely, similar slope angle. Debris didn't run as far, and blocks of debris were much larger (see picture!). Almost the entire slope ran to the ground. A more stout crust was present between the facets and the rounds above them. Depth hoar was somewhat less well-developed. 

Note: Both slides were in zones that seemed ripe for rockfall as well as snow dropping from the rocks above (especially with the warming). I didn't see obvious signs, but can imagine that rockfall or snow from these same cliffs may have triggered either or both of these slides. Also of interest, I dug to the ground on a SSE slope (height of snowpack ~5ft) and found facets at the bottom. They seemed to be rounding more quickly than on the N and E aspects, but were still present. 

Avalanche Photos: 
Snowpit or crown profile photo or graph: 
More detailed information about the weather: 

Windy and quite warm.

37° 15' 42.4764" N, 118° 39' 44.9892" W
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