Avalanche Advisory: Tuesday - Apr 2, 2019

THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON April 4, 2019 @ 6:47 am
Avalanche Advisory published on April 2, 2019 @ 6:47 am
Issued by Chris Engelhardt - Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center

This Avalanche Advisory is in effect for April 2-3. Heightened avalanche conditions for fresh WIND SLAB will exist on N-E  ASPECTS at Upper elevations due to new snow (2-8”) and loading southerly winds. WET LOOSE avalanche conditions on ALL ASPECTS will be an on-going danger exacerbated by warm temperatures and limited recent overnight freezing. Human triggered avalanches may be possible on specific terrain features.  Evaluate snow and terrain carefully and identify features of concern.

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Avalanche Problem 1: Wind Slab
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Prevailing SOUTHERLY winds combined with light amounts (2-8”) of snowfall will load NORTHERLY-EASTERLY slopes throughout the forecast zone today and tonight.  Terrain conducive to wind loading such as leeward cirques, gullies, cornice lines and catchment areas will be most sensitive to both human and natural triggers. New wind slab will be forming not only on a variety of firm wind shorn surfaces, but on top of stubborn existing wind slabs and melt-freeze crusts. Evaluating specific terrain features and freshly formed new wind deposited snow such as pillows, uneven snow surfaces, and fat looking ribbons will be key to safe travel in the mountains the next few days. Pay particular attention when travelling in terrain that is exposed from above such as couloirs and gullies where avalanche danger may escalate with new snowfall and loading winds.

Avalanche Problem 2: Loose Wet
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There has NOT been a robust freeze for the past few nights at lower elevations with temperatures residing just below freezing at the 9000’ level for only a few hours. An  increasingly warming snowpack with the onset of spring combined with light overnight freezes and cloud cover producing a greenhouse effect has led to wet, unsupportable snow on virtually all aspects, even up high on the northerlies. Although cloud cover today will reduce the effect of solar input, the warm temperatures and lack of hard freezing will make for some loose wet potential. Tomorrow, clear skies and fresh new snow available to melt, may well produce a significant amount of shedding wet snow on all aspects. Check the snow for supportability by taking off your ski or snowboard and seeing what your boot penetration is; if you’re going beyond boot top, it may be time turn around. Also be on the lookout for active roller balling, pinwheels or active avalanche activity. Give careful consideration to all aspects over the course of the next few days in regards to wet-loose slide potential.

advisory discussion

It has been just the season we have needed in California with not only plenty of water for our coffers, but to satisfy all the riders/skiers that were ready for a very full season of riding. The ESAC Forecasters really appreciate all the help with submitted observations and information this winter while you've been out adventuring. As we transition into spring and to issuing avalanche advisories 4 days a week, we encourage you to keep letting us know what your seeing out there as the "second season" of spring skiing commences here on the Eastside. THANKS AGAIN OBSERVERS!!!!

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
weather summary

Mostly cloudy conditions with morning snow showers and then widespread snow showers and isolated thunderstorms this afternoon. 2-8” is predicted for today through tonight for mid to upper elevations. SW winds will prevail with moderate velocities of 15-25mph below 10000ft with higher speeds of 20-35 mph at higher elevations. Gusts will be in the 45-50mph range. Temperatures will still be well above freezing at 35-45F at lower elevations while 28-34F will keep things just a bit cooler up high, but not by much.

A sunnier day is slated for Wednesday with clear skies giving way to partly cloudy conditions and warm temperatures 40-48F below 10000ft and 34-40F in the highest mountains. Light to moderate SW winds will prevail with winds at 15-25mph that will likely move some freshly deposited snow around in the high country.

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Reno NWS
For 8,000 ft. to 10,000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Mostly cloudy. Snow likely in the morning, then widespread snow showers and isolated thunderstorms possible in the afternoon. Snow levels 7500 feet. Chance of precipitation is 75%. Mostly cloudy then becoming partly cloudy. Scattered snow showers in the evening. Snow levels 7000 feet decreasing to below 7000 feet after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 35%. Sunny then becoming partly cloudy. Snow levels below 7000 feet increasing to 7500 feet in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 0%.
Temperatures: 35 to 45. deg. F. 21 to 26. deg. F. 40 to 48. deg. F.
Mid Slope Winds: Southwest 15 to 25 mph. Gusts up to 45 mph. Southwest 15 to 25 mph. Gusts up to 40 mph. South southwest 10 to 15 mph.
Expected snowfall: 80% probability of 2 to 6 inches. 20% probability of 4 to 8 inches. | SWE = 0.15-0.40 inch. in. 80% probability up to 2 inches. 20% probability of 2 to 4 inches. | SWE = less than 0.10 inch. in. 0 in.
Over 10,000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Cloudy. Snow likely in the morning, then widespread snow showers and isolated possible thunderstorms in the afternoon. Snow levels 7500 feet. Chance of precipitation is 85%. Mostly cloudy. Scattered snow showers in the evening, then slight chance of snow showers after midnight. Snow levels 7000 feet decreasing to below 7000 feet after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 40%. Sunny then becoming partly cloudy. Snow levels below 7000 feet increasing to 7500 feet in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 5%.
Temperatures: 28 to 34. deg. F. 16 to 21. deg. F. 34 to 40. deg. F.
Ridge Top Winds: Southwest 20 to 35 mph with gusts to 50 mph. Southwest 25 to 35 mph with gusts to 50 mph decreasing to 15 to 30 mph with gusts to 40 mph after midnight. Southwest 15 to 25 mph. Gusts up to 35 mph decreasing to 25 mph in the afternoon.
Expected snowfall: 80% probability of 4 to 6 inches. 20% probability of 6 to 8 inches. | SWE = up to 0.45 inch. in. 80% probability up to 1 inch. 20% probability of 2 to 4 inches. | SWE = less than 0.10 inch. in. 0 in.
Disclaimer
This Avalanche Advisory is designed to generally describe avalanche conditions where local variations always occur. This product only applies to backcountry areas located outside established ski area boundaries. The information in this Avalanche Advisory is provided by the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center, who is solely responsible for its content.

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