Avalanche Advisory: Thursday - Feb 6, 2020

THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON February 7, 2020 @ 6:53 am
Avalanche Advisory published on February 6, 2020 @ 6:53 am
Issued by Josh Feinberg - Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center

LOW avalanche danger continues at all elevations.  Warming temperatures, low wind and sunshine could lead to some minor loose wet instability on sunny aspects.  Be prepared for firm and variable conditions. 

 

1. Low

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Above Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Near Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Below Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
    Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
Avalanche Problem 1: Normal Caution
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While chances of triggering an avalanche are extremely low, it is never impossible.  A small thin isolated windslab in extreme terrain and small loose wet instabilities on sunny aspects as they warm are things to keep in mind.

Always practice good safe travel protocols such as exposing one person at a time, good open communication, and continual evaluation of your local conditions.  We all know to carry the basic avalanche gear: beacon / shovel / probe, but when is the last time you took it all out and practiced?

 
advisory discussion

Yesterday’s low cloud cover and warm temperatures led to moist surface snow conditions even on protected northerly facing slopes up to mid-elevations. While avalanche hazard remains minimal, variable conditions should keep you on your toes. Firm wind-board, frozen melt-freeze surfaces, breakable crusts, and sastrugi could all be found on the same slope.  Crampons (boot and/or ski), ice ax and whippet could be very useful tools depending on your objective.  Use good judgement as a fall in many places could be hard to self-arrest. 

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
weather summary

Partly cloudy skies this morning should clear by the afternoon with high temperatures reaching the upper 30s around 10,000’.  Light N winds are expected with moderate gusts over ridgetops.  

 

Warm and dry weather will continue until Sunday when a cold front moves in resulting in very strong NE winds, a significant drop in temperatures, and a chance for light snow showers.  A quote from Reno NWS: “This looks like the strongest NE wind event in several years.”  Still no significant snowfall on the extended forecast radar :-(.

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Reno NWS
For 8,000 ft. to 10,000 ft.
Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Weather: Partly cloudy then becoming sunny. Snow levels 7000 feet increasing to 8000 feet in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 5%. Clear. Snow levels 7000 feet decreasing to below 7000 feet after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 0%. Sunny. Snow levels below 7000 feet. Chance of precipitation is 0%.
Temperatures: 38 to 48. deg. F. 21 to 27. deg. F. 42 to 52. deg. F.
Mid Slope Winds: Light winds. Light winds. Northwest around 15 mph with gusts to 25 mph.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Over 10,000 ft.
Thursday Thursday Night Friday
Weather: Partly cloudy then becoming sunny. Snow levels 7000 feet increasing to 8000 feet in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 5%. Clear. Snow levels 7000 feet decreasing to below 7000 feet after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 0%. Sunny. Snow levels below 7000 feet increasing to 7000 feet in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 0%.
Temperatures: 31 to 39. deg. F. 17 to 22. deg. F. 35 to 43. deg. F.
Ridge Top Winds: North 15 to 20 mph with gusts to 30 mph. Northwest 15 to 20 mph with gusts to 30 mph. Northwest 15 to 20 mph with gusts to 30 mph.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Disclaimer
This Avalanche Advisory is designed to generally describe avalanche conditions where local variations always occur. This product only applies to backcountry areas located outside established ski area boundaries. The information in this Avalanche Advisory is provided by the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center, who is solely responsible for its content.

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