Avalanche Advisory: Sunday - Mar 24, 2019

THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON March 25, 2019 @ 6:59 am
Avalanche Advisory published on March 24, 2019 @ 6:59 am
Issued by Josh Feinberg - Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center

MODERATE avalanche danger exists today at all elevations due to fresh wind slabs formed by yesterday’s 3-5” of new snow that was accompanied by strong SW winds.  Human triggered avalanches will be very possible.  For southern areas which may have received less new snow, avalanche danger will be less concerning.

2. Moderate

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Above Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.

2. Moderate

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Near Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.

2. Moderate

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Below Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
    Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
Avalanche Problem 1: Wind Slab
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Snowfall amounts yesterday hit the high end of expectations, and winds were stronger than expected gusting into the 70s over ridgelines and plenty strong transporting snow even at low elevations.  Watch for denser deposits of new snow, signs such as shooting cracks, and clues such as cornice growth to help determine where fresh sensitive wind slabs may exist.  Be wary of the leeward side of ridges, sidewalls of gullies, and other steep convex deposition zones across slopes.  Do your own localized assessments and avoid steep freshly wind-loaded terrain. A slide today could be large enough to bury a person, especially if a terrain trap is involved.  Sunny skies this morning could warm E to SE facing wind-loaded slopes making them more sensitive.   

Avalanche Problem 2: Cornice
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Yesterday’s new snow and winds added on to already existing cornices.  It will be tricky today to determine where a cornice may support you, and where it may give-way.  Use caution along ridge-tops, and give the edges where cornices may exist a healthy berth.  A significant cornice failure could trigger a larger than expected avalanche on the slope below.

Avalanche Problem 3: Loose Wet
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Watch for rollerballs and small point releases originating from steep rocky solar aspects as they warm from the sun today.  

advisory discussion

 

It appears from limited remote sensor information and the forecasted snowfall amounts that less than an inch of new snow fell in the mountains south toward Bishop.  Continue to do your own localized assessments of new snowfall amounts as you travel deeper into the mountains.  Firm conditions under small amounts of new snow can make travel challenging.  Crampons, ski crampons, whippet and ice ax can make for safer easier travel.   

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
weather summary

A break in unsettled weather is on tap for today, with sunny skies, light SW winds with moderate gusts at upper elevations, and highs near 30° around 10,000’.  

S to SW winds will increase overnight and into tomorrow as a precursor of stormy windy weather for the rest of the week.  Light snow with little accumulation is expected for Monday night thru Tuesday, and then 1-2ft of snow is expected over the Sierra crest Tuesday night thru Wednesday night. 

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Reno NWS
For 8,000 ft. to 10,000 ft.
Sunday Sunday Night Monday
Weather: Sunny then becoming partly cloudy. Partly cloudy. Partly cloudy then becoming mostly cloudy. Slight chance of snow in the afternoon. Snow levels below 7000 feet. Chance of precipitation is 15%.
Temperatures: 34 to 44. deg. F. 19 to 25. deg. F. 36 to 46. deg. F.
Mid Slope Winds: Light winds. South around 15 mph. Gusts up to 25 mph increasing to 45 mph after midnight. South 15 to 25 mph increasing to 25 to 35 mph in the afternoon. Gusts up to 60 mph.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 80% probability of no accumulation. 20% probability of 1 to 2 inches. | SWE = trace amounts. in.
Over 10,000 ft.
Sunday Sunday Night Monday
Weather: Sunny then becoming partly cloudy. Partly cloudy. Partly cloudy then becoming mostly cloudy. Slight chance of snow in the afternoon. Snow levels below 7000 feet. Chance of precipitation is 15%.
Temperatures: 27 to 33. deg. F. 13 to 18. deg. F. 27 to 35. deg. F.
Ridge Top Winds: Southwest around 15 mph with gusts to 25 mph. Southwest 15 to 25 mph with gusts to 35 mph shifting to the south 20 to 35 mph with gusts to 55 mph after midnight. South 30 to 40 mph shifting to the southwest 30 to 50 mph in the afternoon. Gusts up to 75 mph.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 80% probability of no accumulation. 20% probability of 1 to 2 inches. | SWE = less than 0.10 inch. in.
Disclaimer
This Avalanche Advisory is designed to generally describe avalanche conditions where local variations always occur. This product only applies to backcountry areas located outside established ski area boundaries. The information in this Avalanche Advisory is provided by the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center, who is solely responsible for its content.

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