Avalanche Advisory: Monday - Mar 18, 2019

THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON March 19, 2019 @ 6:44 am
Avalanche Advisory published on March 18, 2019 @ 6:44 am
Issued by Chris Engelhardt - Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center

The avalanche danger will increase to MODERATE throughout the day at Middle-Lower elevations due to heating on solar aspects. LOW avalanche danger exists at Upper elevations. Loose wet avalanches on SOUTHERLY aspects are the chief concern, warranting heightened vigilance in confined and rocky terrain where solar effects will be intensified.

1. Low

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Above Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

2. Moderate

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Near Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.

2. Moderate

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Below Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
    Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
Avalanche Problem 1: Loose Wet
  • Type ?
  • Aspect/Elevation ?
  • Likelihood ?
    Certain
    Very Likely
    Likely
    Possible
    Unlikely
  • Size ?
    Historic
    Very Large
    Large
    Small

Strong solar input and warm temperatures will loosen snow on solar E-S-W aspects. Be particularly aware of SOUTHERLY aspects mid to late afternoon in confined terrain such as couloirs or other constricted features that have larger starting zones or feeding slopes above that will get significantly heated during the day. Resulting avalanches may start small, but could entrain a large amount of heavy saturated snow as they make their way down the mountain. Be on the lookout for areas of unsupportable snow (take off your ski/board and check for boot penetration), pinwheeling, roller balls or active shedding of snow surfaces.

advisory discussion

A partly cloudy start to the day and some cooling southerly winds may keep solar aspects from warming as much as they have the last couple of days, but it is still important to be observant of changing conditions related to heating of slopes. We are in the transitional time of the year when most snowfields are still in a wintery state and are adjusting and changing with the increased day light and warming temperatures. Aspect choice is key right now- not only for finding good riding, but to avoiding getting on slopes that are too wet or conversly are boiler plate. Some northerly aspects in areas are skiing pretty well, while a majority are composed of a variety of unpleasent snow surfaces from breakable crust to super firm windboard. Being aware of CORNICES and avoiding traveling on or below them; intense solar and warm temperatures can contribute to destabilization of these hanging features. 

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
weather summary

Sunny skies will dominate after a partly cloudy start to the day. Light southerly winds with some moderate gusts (30mph) at ridge top are expected. Above freezing temperatures and warm conditions will continue today and tomorrow before things start cooling off later Tuesday with expected chance of snow showers and potential accumulations Tuesday night.

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Reno NWS
For 8,000 ft. to 10,000 ft.
Monday Monday Night Tuesday
Weather: Partly cloudy then becoming sunny. Clear then becoming partly cloudy. Mostly cloudy. Slight chance of snow showers in the afternoon.
Temperatures: 41 to 49. deg. F. 22 to 27. deg. F. 42 to 48. deg. F.
Mid Slope Winds: South up to 10 mph. South up to 10 mph. Southeast 10 to 15 mph with gusts to 25 mph.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Over 10,000 ft.
Monday Monday Night Tuesday
Weather: Partly cloudy. Clear then becoming partly cloudy. Partly cloudy then becoming mostly cloudy. Slight chance of snow showers in the afternoon. Snow levels below 7000 feet increasing to 8000 feet in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 15%.
Temperatures: 33 to 39. deg. F. 17 to 22. deg. F. 33 to 39. deg. F.
Ridge Top Winds: South to southwest 15 to 20 mph with gusts to 30 mph. Southeast around 15 mph. Southeast 15 to 25 mph with gusts to 35 mph.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. trace amounts in.
Disclaimer
This Avalanche Advisory is designed to generally describe avalanche conditions where local variations always occur. This product only applies to backcountry areas located outside established ski area boundaries. The information in this Avalanche Advisory is provided by the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center, who is solely responsible for its content.

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