Avalanche Advisory: Monday - Feb 3, 2020

THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON February 4, 2020 @ 6:42 am
Avalanche Advisory published on February 3, 2020 @ 6:42 am
Issued by Chris Engelhardt - Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center

LOW avalanche danger exists at all Elevations. Look for isolated pockets of shallow Wind Slab at Upper to Middle elevations today. 

1. Low

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Above Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Near Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Below Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
    Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
Avalanche Problem 1: Wind Slab
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  • Aspect/Elevation ?
  • Likelihood ?
    Certain
    Very Likely
    Likely
    Possible
    Unlikely
  • Size ?
    Historic
    Very Large
    Large
    Small

100mph SW winds eroded more snow from the high country Sunday and although most of it was likely sublimated in the atmosphere, there may have been some erratic loading on isolated N-E aspects especially at tree line. Combine yesterday’s maelstrom with today’s Northerly winds and last night’s dusting of new snow and there is potential for isolated pockets of thin wind slab residing on a variety of slick surfaces. The Northern part of the forecast zone, in particular Virginia Lakes, received the most new snow last night at around 2”.  Of most concern would be some flowing spindrift or small wind slabs that release and funnel down tight or confined terrain. Keep a heads up if your spending time in terrain features (couloirs, chutes, gullies) that potentially channel small amounts of cascading snow from heights above.

Look for unstable snow conditions on isolated terrain features and identify surface deposits such as ribbons of new snow, pillows adjacent to ridgeline, rock outcroppings and cliff bands and avoid riding over terrain traps.

advisory discussion

Thin and overall super variable snow surface conditions continue to diminish and degrade. Although there is always something to be found that is enjoyable to ride, the biggest hazards continue to be the variable and inconsistent surface conditions interspersed with rocks, wood, and patches of super firm panels to boot. Most objectives present more of an adventure than decent skiing, as there has been hardly any new snow for a long long time now. Be careful out there, and consider risk vs reward when it comes to tackling breakable crust, boiler plate and thin faceted conditions over exposure.

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
weather summary

Get the cold weather gear back out as today will be dramatically colder. 4-12F temperatures are slated for the high elevations with 12-20F below 10000ft. Moderate northerly winds will blow in the 20-30mph velocity with 60mph gusts today. Dry and Sunny conditions prevail for the rest of the week.

 

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Reno NWS
For 8,000 ft. to 10,000 ft.
Monday Monday Night Tuesday
Weather: Sunny. Snow levels below 7000 feet. Chance of precipitation is 5%. Clear. Snow levels below 7000 feet. Chance of precipitation is 0%. Sunny. Snow levels below 7000 feet. Chance of precipitation is 0%.
Temperatures: 12 to 20. deg. F. 1 below to 5 above zero. deg. F. 18 to 26. deg. F.
Mid Slope Winds: North 15 to 30 mph with gusts to 55 mph. North 15 to 25 mph. Northeast around 15 mph with gusts to 30 mph.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Over 10,000 ft.
Monday Monday Night Tuesday
Weather: Sunny. Snow levels below 7000 feet. Chance of precipitation is 5%. Clear. Snow levels below 7000 feet. Chance of precipitation is 0%. Sunny. Snow levels below 7000 feet. Chance of precipitation is 0%.
Temperatures: 4 to 12. deg. F. 1 below to 6 below zero. deg. F. 11 to 19. deg. F.
Ridge Top Winds: North 20 to 35 mph with gusts to 60 mph. North 20 to 35 mph. Northeast 20 to 35 mph.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Disclaimer
This Avalanche Advisory is designed to generally describe avalanche conditions where local variations always occur. This product only applies to backcountry areas located outside established ski area boundaries. The information in this Avalanche Advisory is provided by the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center, who is solely responsible for its content.

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