Avalanche Advisory: Friday - Feb 28, 2020

THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON February 29, 2020 @ 6:26 am
Avalanche Advisory published on February 28, 2020 @ 6:26 am
Issued by Steve Mace - ESAC

LOW avalanche danger persists at all elevations today. While generally safe avalanche conditions exist, it will not be impossible to find isolated areas of unstable snow today. Continue to practice safe travel techniques and keep an eye out for isolated instabilities.

1. Low

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Above Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Near Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Below Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
    Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
Avalanche Problem 1: Normal Caution
  • Type ?
advisory discussion

Increasing cloud cover and moderate SW winds are expected today and may limit the amount of surface melt we see. However, with a weak freeze overnight and very warm temperatures expected it will still be good to monitor throughout the day, particularly if the cloud cover is less substantial than expected. Wet, sticky snow surface, rollerballs and pinwheels, and increasing boot penetration are all signs of surface warming and may foreshadow larger point release avalanches.

While we hope for a change of pattern and a return to winter-like conditions, over the last month we have seen the snowpack slowly dwindle. The quick storm and new snow last weekend was a welcome sight but unfortunately was not enough to change the big picture.  Avalanche danger remains low and the variable and firm surface conditions coupled with the overall thin coverage remain the largest hazards.  In many areas, the new snow has simply covered obstacles that would otherwise be visible. Some solar aspects that still hold snow have seen many days of melt-freeze cycle and resemble something more typical to late spring. Conversely many shaded aspects are harboring settled new snow, a variety of temperature crusts, and/or loose dry faceted snow.  A fall could be hard to self-arrest in many areas and exposed rocks and other obstacles may increase the consequence of a fall. Continue to practice safe travel techniques and bring the proper equipment for your objective.  

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
weather summary

Expect increasing clouds today as daytime temperatures stay well above seasonal averages. Highs in the mid 40°s or low 50°s at mid-elevations. Light winds this morning will increase substantially this afternoon with ridgetop gusts expect over 40 mph.

High pressure remains in control throughout the day. temperatures are likely to drop tomorrow as cold front approaches from the northwest.  Gusty southwest winds and small amounts of snowfall are possible on Sunday.

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Reno NWS
For 8,000 ft. to 10,000 ft.
Friday Friday Night Saturday
Weather: Mostly cloudy. Mostly cloudy. Mostly cloudy then becoming partly cloudy.
Temperatures: 43 to 53. deg. F. 27 to 33. deg. F. 37 to 47. deg. F.
Mid Slope Winds: Light winds becoming southwest 15 to 25 mph with gusts to 45 mph in the afternoon. Southwest 15 to 25 mph with gusts to 40 mph. Southwest 15 to 30 mph increasing to 25 to 35 mph in the afternoon. Gusts up to 60 mph.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Over 10,000 ft.
Friday Friday Night Saturday
Weather: Mostly cloudy. Mostly cloudy. Mostly cloudy then becoming partly cloudy.
Temperatures: 33 to 41. deg. F. 21 to 26. deg. F. 28 to 36. deg. F.
Ridge Top Winds: Southwest around 15 mph with gusts to 25 mph increasing to 20 to 30 mph with gusts to 40 mph in the afternoon. Southwest 25 to 40 mph with gusts to 60 mph. Southwest 30 to 45 mph increasing to 40 to 55 mph in the afternoon. Gusts up to 85 mph.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Disclaimer
This Avalanche Advisory is designed to generally describe avalanche conditions where local variations always occur. This product only applies to backcountry areas located outside established ski area boundaries. The information in this Avalanche Advisory is provided by the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center, who is solely responsible for its content.

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